Going Green! Conservation and trail blazing

The Craftsman Lodge is going green!

conservation footprint
We have instituted many conservation savings ideas at The Craftsman Lodge to reduce our carbon footprint. We are also starting to rehabilitate the property beginning with rebuilding the pond for spring, construction of two walk-way bridges over the small ravine that runs down one side of the property, clearing the walking paths, and installing a wood fired sauna built from recycled material from our deck replacement. Maybe even construction of a tree house if there is enough left over material!

We just finished installing all LED/CFL lighting, ditching the old incandescent and halogen floodlights. Additionally, both wood stoves are up and running with plenty of split wood to burn culled from the property (fire mitigation), drastically reducing our gas fired forced air heat, at the choice of the guests of course. We have built two 5 x 2 1/2 foot composters for all kitchen waste, using horse manure as a starter and to keep the wildlife away from the composter, and reducing our trash significantly.

Conservation Recycle SymbolWe have also placed recycling containers in the kitchen and barn for all glass, metal, plastic and cardboard which has reduced our trash by 80%. We cart the recycling material to Pueblo once a month. Planned in the near future is the refurbishment of the outhouse for our campers into a composting toilet using the saw dust from the firewood as the composting material. We are also planning a rainwater catchment system to keep the pond filled for the area wildlife as well as solar power for the house well. Guests are welcome to suggest additionally improvements to the property!

Follow the links below for more green ideas!

http://www.siea.com/
http://rootsrecycling.com/
http://www.ccdisposalco.com/

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Grand Re-Opening “The Craftsman Lodge”

Ribbon Cutting at The Craftsman Lodge

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

CONTACT:
Cathy Blanton
The Craftsman Lodge
719-989-0853
craftsmanlodge@gmail.com
www.craftsmanlodge.com

Grand Reopening “The Craftsman Lodge”

Rye, Colorado, November 3, 2016 – The Craftsman Lodge located on Greenhorn Mountain is now taking reservations for the 2016/2017 tourist/wedding season. Our new proprietor, Cathy Blanton, has always dreamed of running a B&B, and after 30 years, she found The Craftsman Lodge, in Rye Colorado. To introduce ourselves to the local community, we are planning an Open House and Ribbon Cutting Ceremony on November 11, 2016 from 2:00 – 4:00pm at The Craftsman Lodge.

The Lodge is located southwest of the quaint town of Rye in the Greenhorn Mountains of Southern Colorado. Done in the Arts and Crafts design era inspired by the writings of John Ruskin, the lodge is a romantic idealization of the craftsman taking pride in his personal handiwork. The Craftsman Lodge delivers as work of art in the form of a wonderful getaway.

The Craftsman Lodge is the perfect place to have your next family reunion, Christmas get together, host your Wedding party/rehearsal dinner, or just a weekend getaway to enjoy the stunning views while relaxing on the deck of the Lodge. You don’t want to miss the beautiful fall colors, breathtaking views, and comfortable temperatures in Colorado.

Visit our new Web site www.craftsmanlodge.com to see everything the Lodge has to offer and make your reservation today. Don’t forget to “Like” our Facebook page and stay abreast of all that’s happening at The Craftsman Lodge during the coming year.

 

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The Greenhorn Valley

History:

Cuerno Verde in Greenhorn ValleyLegend has it the Greenhorn Mountians and Greenhorn Valley get their names from Comanche Indian Chief Tabivo Naritgant. The Spanish gave him the nickname “Cuerno Verde”, which translates to “Green Horn” in English. When in battle, Cuerno Verde wore a head-dress with green tinted horns. Cuerno Verde, which translates to “Green Horn” in English, is the Spanish name given to Tabivo Naritgant because of the green tinted horns that he wore on his head-dress in battle. The English translation of the original Comanche name is “Dangerous Man”.[1] He inherited both his name and his distinctive head dress from his father, who was killed in combat against the Spanish at Ojo Caliente, in what is now New Mexico, in October 1768.

Spaniard Juan Bautista de Anza, then Governor of the area that is now New Mexico, hunted Cuerno Verde because of raid he made into Anza’s territories.

Comanche and Spanish forces met in a series of running battles between August 31 and September 3, 1779. Cuerno Verde died in one of those battles on September 3 somewhere between the present day cities of Pueblo, Colorado and Colorado City, Colorado, probably in a gully of the St. Charles River.

Although Anza called him a “cruel scourge” and made note in his diaries of atrocities attributed to him, many modern Comanches question the veracity of Anza’s statements and maintain that Tabivo Naritgant was only meeting the obligations of a responsible Comanche leader of the period.
Source: Wikipedia.org

Today:

The Greenhorn Valley consists of the communities of Rye and Colorado City, about 5,500 people. The town of Rye has been around since the late 1800’s. Development of Colorado City began in earnest in the late 1960’s.

The Greenhorn Valley sits at the foot of the majestic Greenhorn Mountain, which at 12,347 feet above sea level is the highest point of the Wet Mountain Range. The mountain is encompassed by the Greenhorn Wilderness Area. There are two main trails that access the mountain, the Bartlett Trail and the Greenhorn Trail. Both are just minutes away from the Craftsman Lodge. The Greenhorn Mountain can also be accessed by vehicle via the Ophir Creek Road. Total drive time is about 1 hour, and though a four-wheel drive vehicle is not necessary, a vehicle with good ground clearance is recommended if you want to drive all the way to the end of the road.

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Bear Country

Bear and Cubs in Bear CountryThe Craftsman Lodge lies in the heart of bear country. While the chances of meeting bears are relatively low, largely because of bears’ disinterest in most people, you must know how to avoid, recognize, and deal with bear encounters.
Bears are strong and agile wild animals that will defend themselves, their young, and their territory if they feel threatened. All bears are potentially dangerous; they are unpredictable and able to inflict serious injury. NEVER feed or approach a bear.

Tips for Safe Camping

  • Put away food and garbage, strong attractions to bears. Keep your campsite clean and never leave food, garbage, coolers, cooking equipment or utensils lying around.
  • Lock food in the trunk of your vehicle or hang it at least 12 feet off the ground between two trees.
  • Do not cook or eat in or near your tent or tent trailer.
  • The lingering odors of food invite bears. Clean utensils and put garbage in containers immediately after eating.
  • Do not get food odors on your clothing or sleeping bag. Sleep in different clothing than what you wear for cooking.
  • Use a flashlight at night. Many animals feed at night, and a flashlight may warn them away.
  • Tips for Safe Hiking
  • Bears feel threatened if surprised. Hike in a group and make loud noises. Whistle, talk, sing, or carry a noise maker (e.g. bells).Most bears will leave if they are aware of your presence. Stay in the open as much as possible. Keep children close at hand on trails.
  • Be especially alert when traveling into the wind. A bear may not get your scent and be warned of your presence. In dense bush and near rushing water, the animal likely won’t hear your noise-maker.
  • Stay away from dead animals and berry patches, important food sources for bears. You’ll often see crows and ravens circling over dead animals.
  • Watch for bear signs, tracks, fresh diggings, and droppings.
  • NEVER approach a bear, especially a bear cub. A protective mother is usually nearby and may attack if she thinks her cub is in danger.
  • Bear Confrontations
  • Make a wide detour or leave the area if you see a bear at a distance. If you cannot detour or retreat, wait until the bear moves from your path. Always leave the animal an escape route.
  • Do not run. Most bears can run as fast as a racehorse. A scream or sudden movement can trigger an attack.
  • Don’t throw anything at a bear; it may provoke an attack.
  • Watch the bear for aggressive behavior–snapping its jaws together, making a “whoofing” sound, or keeping its head down with ears laid back. Consider any bear that moves toward you aggressive. If the bear does not seem to be displaying aggressive behavior, talk softly in monotones and slowly back up. If a bear rears on its hind legs and waves its nose in the air, it is trying to identify you. Keep still and speak in low tones.
  • Keep calm. Assess the situation. There is no guaranteed life-saving method to cope with an aggressive bear, but calm behavior has proven the most successful. Sometimes bears will bluff their way out of a threatening situation by charging and veering away at the last second. Back away quietly; never run!
  • If a climbable tree is nearby and the bear shows aggressive behavior, speak softly and back slowly toward the tree. At the same time, slowly remove your pack and set it down to distract the bear.
  • Climb a tree as high as you can. Stay in the tree until you are sure the bear has left the area, then make your way quickly back to the trailhead. Black bears are agile climbers, so a tree may not offer an escape from them.
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